Cholesterol by Anni Dahms

Cholesterol by Anni Dahms

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Cholesterol is essential for the formation of many substances in our body, including adrenal hormones, bile salts, sex hormones, vitamin D, and cell structure, among others. Our liver produces cholesterol, and it serves as an important building material, with approximately 95% being synthesized by our bodies and the remaining 5% coming from our diet.

 

There is considerable confusion surrounding cholesterol and what values are best for the body and its function. In recent years, cholesterol has received a great deal of attention, to the point that when you hear the words “elevated cholesterol,” you automatically think of cardiovascular diseases and premature death. Cholesterol-lowering medications are being sold in unprecedented quantities. Cholesterol is considered one of our modern lifestyle diseases. However, there are other doctors and experts, such as Dr. Bradley Bale, who argue that inflammation of the arterial walls is a more significant marker for potential cardiovascular diseases.There is considerable confusion surrounding cholesterol and what values are best for the body and its function. In recent years, cholesterol has received a great deal of attention, to the point that when you hear the words “elevated cholesterol,” you automatically think of cardiovascular diseases and premature death. Cholesterol-lowering medications are being sold in unprecedented quantities. Cholesterol is considered one of our modern lifestyle diseases. However, there are other doctors and experts, such as Dr. Bradley Bale, who argue that inflammation of the arterial walls is a more significant marker for potential cardiovascular diseases.

Cholesterol values

Cholesterol values are used to predict our risk of developing blood clots in the heart. However, studies have shown that approximately 70% of people who experience blood clots have normal cholesterol levels. Some experts believe that sugar consumption and elevated triglyceride levels are just as likely to cause cardiovascular problems as high cholesterol levels.
There are several different types of cholesterol. The two most important ones are HDL, often referred to as the “good” cholesterol, and LDL, often referred to as the “bad” cholesterol. In the past, these two forms of cholesterol were combined into one measurement. However, it is now more common to measure HDL and LDL separately. If LDL is significantly elevated, there may be an indication of a risk for heart disease.
The total cholesterol level is measured in mg/dl of blood. The total cholesterol should ideally not exceed 225 mg/dl. Normal values for HDL range from 30-90 mg/dl, while normal LDL values range from 50-190 mg/dl.
If cholesterol levels are lowered excessively, experts warn that it may increase the risk of joint problems, suicide, and cancer.
Robby Curdorf writes in his book “The Suppressed Knowledge of Healing,” that a total cholesterol level below 180 mg/dl can be dangerous, and in such cases, there is a greater risk of death from stroke, cerebral hemorrhage, alcoholism, drug abuse, smoking, liver cancer, lung diseases, depression, and suicidal thoughts.
Uffe Ravnsborg, another prominent critic of the way we dramatically lower cholesterol levels with medication, obtained his medical degree from the University of Copenhagen in 1961. He wrote the book “Cholesterol, Myths, and Realities,” which was published in 2008. The book contains more than 400 scientific references. On the cover, it says: DID YOU KNOW… that people with high cholesterol live longer than the elderly with low cholesterol? The book is such an exciting read that various crime novels pale in comparison, in my opinion. Uffe Ravnsborg writes: The purpose of the book is to explain why the cholesterol campaign is one of the biggest medical scandals in recent times.
Although cholesterol is not the culprit it has been made out to be, it is probably most reassuring if cholesterol values are within the normal range. If your cholesterol is high according to official measurements, fortunately, there are many things you can do to normalize it. Remember, it is not about achieving the lowest possible cholesterol level, as cholesterol is vital for our health.

The diet

Atherosclerosis often begins at a young age, but if you eat a healthy diet and ensure an adequate intake of antioxidants, unsaturated fatty acids, vitamins, and minerals, there is less risk of the inflammation that Dr. Bradley Bale and many other experts mention as being dangerous. Therefore, cholesterol, which is vital, is presumably not as harmful.
Consume fewer animal products and more plant-based foods. Include plenty of vegetables in your diet, such as cabbage and beets. Make a variety of smoothies, as they make it easy to meet your daily vegetable needs. If you’re new to this, there are countless wonderful recipes available online.
Eat frequent, small meals. It can reduce overall cholesterol levels. Eat slowly and savor each bite. This way, you will become satiated more quickly. This also applies when making smoothies and juices.
Avoid sugary products. If you crave something sweet, alternative sweeteners like coconut sugar, agave syrup, and maple syrup can be used.
Cut back on coffee, cola, and other caffeinated foods and drinks. Preferably drink tea, as it inhibits the oxidation of LDL (bad cholesterol). The same goes for 1-2 glasses of red wine, while excessive alcohol intake raises cholesterol levels. Avoid fast carbohydrates from white bread, pasta, and similar products.
Consume plenty of fiber. You can sprinkle oats and wheat bran over your breakfast, and include oatmeal and other grains in your diet. Drink an adequate amount of water as well. If you use psyllium fiber products, remember to drink plenty of water.
Include various types of beans, lentils, and brown rice in your diet.
It has been shown that buckwheat can help lower cholesterol. Buckwheat has a delightful taste and is available in cracked grains, whole kernels, flour, and buckwheat pasta.
Be mindful of grilled and fried meats.
Include plenty of fatty fish, onions, garlic, olive oil, and other healthy fats in your diet. Regarding cholesterol, I don’t think you need to be afraid of using coconut oil if you opt for organic virgin coconut oil. An experiment was conducted on rats at the University of Kerala in India to examine the effects of organic virgin coconut oil and regular coconut oil made from copra. Regular refined coconut oil is typically made from copra, which is dried coconut that is not suitable for consumption, hence it undergoes refining. After 45 days of consuming coconut oil, it was found that the rats given organic virgin coconut oil had lower levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, phospholipids, and LDL, while HDL had increased. The coconut oil made from copra did not exhibit any of the aforementioned effects.

 

Dietary Supplements

As usual, always start with a base of high-quality vitamins/minerals and essential fatty acids.

Red yeast rice, available in capsules both alone and in combination with Coenzyme Q10, has also been shown to be beneficial in lowering cholesterol levels.

Q10 is especially important for people taking cholesterol-lowering medication in the form of statins. Statins block the formation of cholesterol and also inhibit the production of Q10. To maintain energy levels and reduce many of the side effects of statins, such as muscle pain, fatigue, shortness of breath, etc., supplementation with Q10 is recommended. It is important for the mitochondria, which produce energy and help prevent cancer and heart diseases. The dosage is typically 100-300 mg of Q10 daily.

Chromium has been shown to lower harmful cholesterol and increase good cholesterol. This is supported by 10 years of research. Chromium is an essential trace mineral, and it can be challenging to obtain the optimal amount through diet alone. An American researcher, Richard Anderson, suggests that everyone needs at least 200 mcg of chromium daily.

Similarly, vitamin C increases good cholesterol.

Niacin, vitamin B3, not only lowers cholesterol but also reduces blood pressure and widens the arteries. Take it as nicotinamide since nicotinic acid can cause flushing. The dosage can range from 50-500 mg daily.

Take a comprehensive B-vitamin supplement. Among other things, it helps stimulate the production of Q10 and lower the dangerous homocysteine levels that often contribute to cholesterol becoming harmful.

Supplementing with magnesium has also shown to increase good cholesterol.

Vitamin E, selenium, and Q10 counteract the oxidation of LDL (bad cholesterol).

Garlic can also help lower LDL cholesterol. It works particularly well when consumed with avocado and olive oil.

Silicon, mostly known for its benefits to hair, skin, and nails, also strengthens blood vessels and thus prevents the penetration of dangerous LDL cholesterol.

Tips

Exercise is of vital importance for maintaining a healthy cholesterol level. Lack of exercise and stress increase the risk of inflammation in the arteries. Choose an activity that suits your temperament and allows you to break a sweat, such as brisk walks, cycling, dancing, etc.
Also, make sure to engage your laughter muscles. Opt for a funny TV show instead of the endless crime dramas.

 

 

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